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Personal Protection - Storage, Maintenance and Care (Sep/Oct-12)
Machine Safeguarding (Jul/Aug-12)
Is Your Lockout & Tagout Program Working? (May/Jun-12)
Getting Familiar with OSHA (Mar/Apr-12)
Is Your Piping Systems Properly Marked? (Jan/Feb-12)
Accident Prevention, Does Your Company Have An Effective Program? (Nov/Dec-11)
Defining FR – Flame Resistant Fabrics (Jul/Aug-11)
OSHA's Flammable & Combustible Liquids (May/Jun-11)
Safety & Health Program Check-up (Jan/Feb-11)
OSHA Is My Friend (Nov/Dec-10)
OSHA Standard for Control of Hazardous Energy Sources? (Sep/Oct-10)
Lockout/Tagout Program (Jul/Aug-10)
Safe Handling of Compressed Gas Cylinders (May/Jun-10)
What You Should Know about OSHA and Plastic Working Machinery (Mar/Apr-10)
Fasten Those Forklift Seat Belts (Jan/Feb-10)
My Back Hurts (Nov/Dec-09)
Fall Protection Program (Sep/Oct-09)
Accident Prevention & Investigation (Jul/Aug-09)
OSHA & Machine Safeguarding (May/Jun-09)
Carbon Monoxide Hazards (Mar/Apr-09)
OSHA Electrical Safety and Training (Jan/Feb-09)
Free Forklift ANSI Standards (Nov/Dec-08)
Worksite Fire Emergencies (Sep/Oct-08)
Machine Safety (Jul/Aug-08)
Ladder Safety (May/Jun-08)
Is Your Company on OSHA's Hit List?
OSHA Notifies Workplaces with High Injury and Illness Rates (Mar/Apr-08)
Safety Means . . . Never Having to Say You're Sorry (Jan/Feb-08)
Flammables and Combustible Liquids (Nov/Dec-07)
Designing-In Safety NOT Retrofitting Safety (Sep/Oct-07)
Back Safety and Lifting (Jul/Aug-07)
Machine Guarding (May/Jun-07)
Your Hearing Keep it for a Lifetime (Mar/Apr-07)
Light Up the Holidays the Safe Way (Nov/Dec-06)
Would You Risk Your Employee's Life? (Sep/Oct-06)
How to Control Workers' Compensation Costs (Jul/Aug-06)
Compliance with 70E Electrical Standards (May/Jun-06)
OSHA Is on the Move (Mar/Apr-06)
Workplace Violence (Jan/Feb-06)
The Aging Workforce (Nov/Dec-05)
The Safety Paradox (Sep/Oct-05)
Machine Guarding (Jul/Aug-05)
Effective Risk Management (May/Jun-05)
Safety Is Everyone's Business (Mar/Apr-05)
New Year's Resolution Safety (Jan/Feb-05)
Safe Driving (Nov/Dec-04)
Terror In The Skies Revisited (Sep/Oct-04)
How They Got Hurt (Jul/Aug-04)
In-Plant Air Monitoring & Analysis (May/Jun-04)
Safety on the Job and Complying with the Americans With Disabilities Act (Mar/Apr-04)
Link to Article Archive (Jan/Feb-04)
A Supervisor's Duty (Nov/Dec-03)
Machine Safety – Are Your Machines Safe to Operate? (Sep/Oct-03)
Summer is Here (Jul/Aug-03)
Working Safely On Powered Industrial Trucks (Forklifts) (May/Jun-03)
Does Your Safety and Health Workplace Program Contain All of These Elements? (Mar/Apr-03)
Methylene Chloride (Jan/Feb-03)
Safety Signs & Labels - Does Your Facility Comply? (Nov/Dec-02)
Indoor Air Quality (Sep/Oct-02)
When OSHA Arrives (Jul/Aug-02)
Facts About the Occupation Safety & Health Administration (OSHA) (May/Jun-02)
Workplace Fire Safety (Mar/Apr-02)
OSHA 300 Form (Jan/Feb-02)
Preparing for Disaster (Nov/Dec-01)
How Much is a Life Worth? (Sep/Oct-01)
Material Handling Programs (Jul/Aug-01)
It's Up To You To Protect Your Skin (May/Jun-01)
When You’ve Been Handed the Responsibility for Safety (Mar/Apr-01)
A Fresh Look at Machine Safeguarding (Jan/Feb-01)
Safe Work Habits (Nov/Dec-00)
The Importance of Material Safety Data Sheets (Sep/Oct-00)
Hazardous Waste Operations and Emergency Response (Jul/Aug-00)
Lockout/Tagout Program (May/Jun-00)
OSHA Violations, Citations and Penalties for 1998 (Mar/Apr-00)
Erogonomics and Machinery Safeguarding (Jan/Feb-00)
General Machine Principles (Nov/Dec-99)
SAFETY SOLUTIONS
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SAFETY SOLUTIONS: Accident Prevention, Does Your Company Have An Effective Program?

I have been in the safety, health and environmental world for the last 40 years and began my career on the factory floor as a machine operator. When OSHA came into existence in 1970, I applied for a job and was hired as an apprentice with a compliance officer number of 60. I worked for OSHA for about 10 years inspecting companies, conducting fatality investigations and so as the story goes on like many others safety professionals, I progressed up the chain of safety life to work for great companies such as Allied Signal Aerospace, Lockheed Aeronautical Systems and finally retiring from the Boeing Corporation as Corporate Safety Manager of Technical Support. In every one of these companies, millions of dollars were spent to build a safety program and protect people but even the safety people fought safety since they did not want to ask management for money to fix the hazards that should not be there to begin with.

Today when I go back to some of these places where I use to work, I see machines still not properly guarded, people still not wearing the proper personal protective equipment and, in some cases, employees being seriously injured or killed and the employer is not properly training the employees. Large companies? You bet, safe companies, probably not. But if you look at OSHA website under company statistics http://www.osha.gov/pls/imis/establishment.html, you will see that these companies are rarely cited by OSHA. Why

As a consultant today and writing for this magazine, I am rarely contacted by readers and asked for advice, which we offer to our readers for free. What is wrong with the picture - commitment from management or people? I have heard management and safety professionals say time and time again, ��do you know how much that will cost to get it fixed?� If your purchasing department ordered the right product it would cost nothing.

I offer a safety warranty, for free, that can be written into your bid specifications when you purchase new or used machinery. If the machine does not meet the most current American National Standards Institute (ANS) Occupational Safety & Health Administration (OSHA), STATE OSHA, National Electrical Codes (NEC) and many more standards, the company that sold you that product or machine must come back and repair it for free. One of my clients saved over 2 million dollars. Do you have safety professional working for you? If so, they should be protecting you (the CEO) and the company�s most valuable asset, the workers, from any type of harm. I currently teach for two leading OSHA Training Institutes as a consultant. I am amazed at what I hear from people coming to these learning environments. Many say their management does not care and will not spend the money to correct the hazards that are found. Is this true? Could people not really care about another workers safety? I say �NO�, management does care when it is brought to the proper level of managements� attention, the CEO level. In reality, fixing the safety problems avoids injuries and keeps the cost of doing business down.

Controlling Losses

If you would like to reduce the costs and risks associated with workplace injuries and illnesses, you need to address safety and health right along with production.

Setting up an Injury and Illness Prevention Program helps you do this. In developing the program, you identify what has to be done to promote the safety and health of your employees and worksite, and you outline policies and procedures to achieve your safety and health goals.

Why Have a Workplace Injury and Illness Prevention Program?

Taking risks is a part of running a business, particularly for small business owners. You take risks in product development, marketing, and advertising in order to stay competitive. Some risks are just not worth the gamble. One of these is risking the safety and health of those who work for you.

Accidents Cost Money

Safety organizations, states, small business owners and major corporations alike now realize that the actual cost of a lost workday injury is substantial. For every dollar you spend on the direct costs of a worker�s injury or illness, you will spend much more to cover the indirect and hidden costs. Consider what one lost workday injury would cost you in terms of:

  • Productive time lost by an injured employee.
  • Productive time lost by employees and supervisors attending the accident victim.
  • Clean up and start up of operations interrupted by the accident.
  • Time to hire or to retrain other individuals to replace the injured worker until his/her return.
  • Time and cost for repair or replacement of any damaged equipment or materials.
  • Cost of continuing all or part of the employee�s wages, in addition to compensation.
  • Reduced morale among your employees, and perhaps lower efficiency.
  • Increased workers� compensation insurance rates.
  • Cost of completing paperwork generated by the incident.

Management Commitment/Assignment of Responsibilities

Your commitment to safety and health shows in every decision you make and every action you take. Your employees will respond to that commitment.

The person or persons with the authority and responsibility for your safety and health program must be identified and given management�s full support. You can demonstrate your commitment through your personal concern for employee safety and health and by the priority you place on these issues.

If you want maximum production and quality, you need to control potential work-place hazards and correct hazardous conditions or practices as they occur or are recognized.

You must commit yourself and your company by building an effective Injury and Illness Prevention Program and integrating it into your entire operation. This commitment must be backed by strong organizational policies, procedures, incentives, and disciplinary actions as necessary to ensure employee compliance with safe and healthful work practices.

In closing, if you have questions on safety related issues, bring them to us and we will try to answer them for you. It is fast approaching the year 2012 don�t you think it is time to bring your safety program in line with the safety standards of today?

For more information, click on the author link at the top of the page.

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