The Plastics Distributor and Fabricator - Your Industry Magazine
The Plastics Distributor and Fabricator, Your Industry Magazine
Plastic Spacer
News Features Series Articles Columns
Plastic Spacer
Return Home
Article Keyword Search
Author Biography
Personal Protection - Storage, Maintenance and Care (Sep/Oct-12)
Machine Safeguarding (Jul/Aug-12)
Is Your Lockout & Tagout Program Working? (May/Jun-12)
Getting Familiar with OSHA (Mar/Apr-12)
Is Your Piping Systems Properly Marked? (Jan/Feb-12)
Accident Prevention, Does Your Company Have An Effective Program? (Nov/Dec-11)
Defining FR – Flame Resistant Fabrics (Jul/Aug-11)
OSHA's Flammable & Combustible Liquids (May/Jun-11)
Safety & Health Program Check-up (Jan/Feb-11)
OSHA Is My Friend (Nov/Dec-10)
OSHA Standard for Control of Hazardous Energy Sources? (Sep/Oct-10)
Lockout/Tagout Program (Jul/Aug-10)
Safe Handling of Compressed Gas Cylinders (May/Jun-10)
What You Should Know about OSHA and Plastic Working Machinery (Mar/Apr-10)
Fasten Those Forklift Seat Belts (Jan/Feb-10)
My Back Hurts (Nov/Dec-09)
Fall Protection Program (Sep/Oct-09)
Accident Prevention & Investigation (Jul/Aug-09)
OSHA & Machine Safeguarding (May/Jun-09)
Carbon Monoxide Hazards (Mar/Apr-09)
OSHA Electrical Safety and Training (Jan/Feb-09)
Free Forklift ANSI Standards (Nov/Dec-08)
Worksite Fire Emergencies (Sep/Oct-08)
Machine Safety (Jul/Aug-08)
Ladder Safety (May/Jun-08)
Is Your Company on OSHA's Hit List?
OSHA Notifies Workplaces with High Injury and Illness Rates (Mar/Apr-08)
Safety Means . . . Never Having to Say You're Sorry (Jan/Feb-08)
Flammables and Combustible Liquids (Nov/Dec-07)
Designing-In Safety NOT Retrofitting Safety (Sep/Oct-07)
Back Safety and Lifting (Jul/Aug-07)
Machine Guarding (May/Jun-07)
Your Hearing Keep it for a Lifetime (Mar/Apr-07)
Light Up the Holidays the Safe Way (Nov/Dec-06)
Would You Risk Your Employee's Life? (Sep/Oct-06)
How to Control Workers' Compensation Costs (Jul/Aug-06)
Compliance with 70E Electrical Standards (May/Jun-06)
OSHA Is on the Move (Mar/Apr-06)
Workplace Violence (Jan/Feb-06)
The Aging Workforce (Nov/Dec-05)
The Safety Paradox (Sep/Oct-05)
Machine Guarding (Jul/Aug-05)
Effective Risk Management (May/Jun-05)
Safety Is Everyone's Business (Mar/Apr-05)
New Year's Resolution Safety (Jan/Feb-05)
Safe Driving (Nov/Dec-04)
Terror In The Skies Revisited (Sep/Oct-04)
How They Got Hurt (Jul/Aug-04)
In-Plant Air Monitoring & Analysis (May/Jun-04)
Safety on the Job and Complying with the Americans With Disabilities Act (Mar/Apr-04)
Link to Article Archive (Jan/Feb-04)
A Supervisor's Duty (Nov/Dec-03)
Machine Safety – Are Your Machines Safe to Operate? (Sep/Oct-03)
Summer is Here (Jul/Aug-03)
Working Safely On Powered Industrial Trucks (Forklifts) (May/Jun-03)
Does Your Safety and Health Workplace Program Contain All of These Elements? (Mar/Apr-03)
Methylene Chloride (Jan/Feb-03)
Safety Signs & Labels - Does Your Facility Comply? (Nov/Dec-02)
Indoor Air Quality (Sep/Oct-02)
When OSHA Arrives (Jul/Aug-02)
Facts About the Occupation Safety & Health Administration (OSHA) (May/Jun-02)
Workplace Fire Safety (Mar/Apr-02)
OSHA 300 Form (Jan/Feb-02)
Preparing for Disaster (Nov/Dec-01)
How Much is a Life Worth? (Sep/Oct-01)
Material Handling Programs (Jul/Aug-01)
It's Up To You To Protect Your Skin (May/Jun-01)
When You’ve Been Handed the Responsibility for Safety (Mar/Apr-01)
A Fresh Look at Machine Safeguarding (Jan/Feb-01)
Safe Work Habits (Nov/Dec-00)
The Importance of Material Safety Data Sheets (Sep/Oct-00)
Hazardous Waste Operations and Emergency Response (Jul/Aug-00)
Lockout/Tagout Program (May/Jun-00)
OSHA Violations, Citations and Penalties for 1998 (Mar/Apr-00)
Erogonomics and Machinery Safeguarding (Jan/Feb-00)
General Machine Principles (Nov/Dec-99)
SAFETY SOLUTIONS
Select issue:


SAFETY SOLUTIONS: A Supervisor's Duty

Your job in management places you in a unique position of trust. Individuals who are in an authoritative or supervising position over others are a direct representative of the employer and must apply company policy wisely and fairly. Also entrusted to you is the obligation to safeguard the employees you supervise. No responsibility transcends this in importance. On-the-job accidents represent a serious threat to the physical well-being of the employees you supervise. Accident prevention calls for your constant vigilance. Therefore, as you perform your supervisory duties, guiding your employees safety through their daily work activities, be guided by these precepts: You are a supervisor and thus, in a sense, you have two families. Care for your people at work as you would care for your family members at home. Be sure each worker you supervise understands and puts into practical use the training and safe work procedures the company provides.

  • Know the rules of safety that apply to the work you oversee. Never let it be said that one of the employees you supervise was injured because you were not aware of the safety precautions required for the work being performed.
  • Anticipate the risks that may arise from changes in equipment or work procedures. Make use of expert safety advice that is available to help you identify new and predictable hazards and then control or eliminate those hazards to keep your people accident-free.
  • Get your employees involved and build a safety culture within your organization. Encourage the employees you supervise to discuss with you the hazards of their work. No job should proceed when a question of safety remains unanswered. When you are receptive to the ideas of your workers, you tap a source of firsthand knowledge that will help you prevent needless loss and suffering.
  • Instruct your employees in the occupational safety and health standards that apply to the work they perform, in company safe work procedures and in the contents of the operator’s manual or manufacturer’s recommendations for machines or equipment they operate or use. As a supervisor it is your responsibility to enforce these rules firmly, fairly and consistently to prevent accidents.
  • Follow up to be sure each employee understands the training and instructions you provide. Employees should know and understand that you cannot allow an individual employee to jeopardize their own safety or the safety of coworkers by working in an unsafe manner. Safety must be enforced with disciplinary action. Do not fail your employer who has implemented the company safe ty program and sanctioned the safety policies. Do not fail the employees you supervise who need your firm, fair and consistent guidance.
  • Set a good example. Demonstrate safety in your own work habits and personal conduct.
  • Investigate every accident, however slight, that befalls any of the employees you supervise. Where minor injuries go unheeded, crippling accidents may latter strike.
  • Cooperate fully with those in the company who manage or facilitate the safety program. Their dedicated purpose is to help you keep the employees you supervise fully able and on the job and to eliminate the heavy personal toll of accidents.
  • Remember, not only does accident prevention reduce human suffering and loss, from a practical viewpoint, it is no more than good business. Therefore safety is one of your prime obligations.

    Developing a safety culture within your organization by leading your workers in thinking safety and ensuring they work safely day by day through firm, fair and consistent supervision, you will earn their loyal support and cooperation.

    For more information, click on the Author Biography link at the top of this page.

    Back To Top
    Plastic Spacer

     
    Copyright © 2014
    Plastics Distributor® & Fabricator Magazine
    P.O. Box 669
    LaGrange, Illinois 60525-0669
    All Rights Reserved.
    Header Image courtesy of Nylatech, Inc.

    Phone: (708) 588-1845
    Fax: (708) 588-1846
    Email Us